Mozart Malware

Mozart sets up a direct line of communication between an infected client and its server. It does this by hardcoding a DNS server IP address to which an infected client resolves, thus bypassing central DNS servers, policy rules, and monitoring. The commands which are then transmitted between the malware server and infected device are hidden in DNS TXT records.

Source: TechRadar

How do you protect yourself?

Proper security measures must be in place to defend against Mozart malware and similar threats. Having proper up-to-date endpoint security provides a cross-generational blend of threat defense techniques to protect systems from malware.

CVE-2020-6805

Mozilla has released security updates for Firefox. When removing data about an origin whose tab was recently closed, a use-after-free could occur in the Quota manager, resulting in a potentially exploitable crash.

Source: Mozilla

How do you protect yourself?

Update Firefox to the latest version.

Paradise Ransomware

A ransomware campaign has returned with a new trick to fool the unwary into compromising their network with file-encrypting malware. And it’s an attack that many Windows machines won’t even recognise as potentially malicious.

The new variant of Paradise ransomware, which has been active in one form or another since 2017, spreads via phishing emails, but it’s different from other ransomware campaigns because it uses an uncommon – but effective – file type to infiltrate the network.

Source: ZDNet

How do you protect yourself?

Proper security measures must be in place to defend against Paradise Ransomware and similar threats. Having proper up-to-date endpoint security provides a cross-generational blend of threat defense techniques to protect systems from malware.