Cybersecurity risks are at an all time high, making security an integral part of an organization’s business. As consumers become more cognizant of data breaches and the threats to their information, they expect organizations to secure their data. Research by Privitar found that 50 per cent of consumers would trust a company less if their data was being inappropriately used. By integrating security inside out via your organizational security culture, you end up with more secure processes and controls to protect customer data. As a result, organizations can build trust with the customers and business partners they work with daily.

Source: ZDNet

How Security Culture Shapes Organizations

Security culture encompasses the beliefs, behaviours and values that drive how an organization approaches security. A good security culture ensures organizations are safeguarding data and decreasing cyber risk by embedding security into their business processes and encouraging employees across all departments to share the security responsibility. 

To reduce risks and protect their network, many organizations implement security technologies like firewalls and anti-malware tools. However, many hackers are targeting employees instead with phishing emails and other social engineering tactics. Without a strong security culture to motivate and guide employees to take security seriously, organizations put their business at unnecessary risk. 

Building a strong security culture is an ongoing process and simple activities like forcing employees to undergo cybersecurity training once a year is not enough. Organizations need to shift their mindset and see their security culture as an opportunity to improve their organization instead of a liability. 

How to Differentiate Your Organization with Security

Building customer trust is not easy and retaining it is even more difficult. Implementing steps to improve security culture will not only give you peace of mind in that you are staying secure but will help you build trust with business partners and customers.

Increase Executive Understanding

Without support from business leadership, having a strong security culture is difficult to maintain. Business leaders are responsible for prioritizing security and ensuring that there is a security budget available. If business leaders aren’t putting in the necessary effort to invest in security, an organization’s overall security culture will be weaker.

Executives who make it a point to have a strong security culture show employees and business partners that they understand the risks cyber threats pose to their business.  This means they are investing in protecting their data by using security solutions and implementing user awareness training. When customers or stakeholders see that security measures are being taken seriously, it makes them more willing to enter business.

Improve Data Security

Security isn’t separate from business processes. In fact, all business processes should have security built in to ensure data is adequately protected. Organizations must consider a data-centric approach to security. This includes being aware of the data they collect, its value and how that data is being secured and accessed. 

An effective cybersecurity culture will help employees mitigate cyber risk and prevent data exfiltration. Being aware of threats like social engineering will help employees be more alert and prevent them from engaging with these attacks. They will also feel more open to reporting these kinds of incidents if they come across them. Limiting employee access to organizational files and ensuring data is encrypted and backed up is also crucial. Integrating cost effective security solutions like those from our Secure IT platform will keep data safe at every threat vectors. 

Review Security Investments

As organizations grow, security measures might change. As you handle more data and/or hire more personnel, security becomes a greater issue. Organizations need to evaluate their security measures to ensure their security culture reflects what the business needs. For example, if you are hiring new employees, make security a part of onboarding. Ensure that new employees read security policies and are required to do cyber awareness training.

Doing a security assessment will help validate security controls and help organizations keep track of their security processes. These assessments help organizations understand where they need to improve and help guide them on how to be more secure. This can help organizations develop their security strategy and help them focus on how to improve. If you are interested in conducting a security assessment for your organization, contact us today.